Domov > Node > Transparency

Transparency

Verzia pre tlačVerzia pre tlačPDF verziaPDF verzia

source: www.compareyourcountry.org

Transparency has been pushed to the top of the global agenda. The DAC's mandate to further the understanding of development finance, strengthen aid delivery, improve development policy and build partnerships for development is both complimentary to and a crucial part of the success of the global transparency agenda. As part of the OECD the DAC is working towards making this "transparency transformation" a success through promoting four dimensions:

  • developing a range of instruments to help governments ensure that openness translates into concrete improvements;
  • supporting e-government and internet-based technologies and applications;
  • providing regular reviews of development partner (donor) countries; and
  • promoting greater transparency as a means to fight corruption.

In line with this transparency agenda, stakeholders in Busan resolved to make information on development co-operation and other development resources better available and publicly accessible. They set out to implement a common, open standard for electronic publication of timely, comprehensive and forward-looking information on resources for development co-operation by the end of 2015.  

The common standard sets out good practice in reporting and publishing data.  It combines three complementary systems and processes: the DAC’s Creditor Reporting System (CRS) and the Forward Spending Survey (FSS) – two reporting instruments of the OECD with comprehensive statistical information – plus IATI.

The common standard enables and encourages providers of development co‑operation to make aid information more transparent along four dimensions:

  1. Greater availability of historical, current and future information on aid flows;
  2. More detailed information on aid projects and programmes (improved comprehensiveness);
  3. Broader coverage and participation (beyond ODA, and beyond traditional donors); and
  4. Improved timeliness and more frequent updates of development financing information.
- See more at: http://www.publishwhatyoufund.org/updates/by-topic/iati/busan-common/#sthash.c7eiiVJi.dpuf

The common standard sets out good practice in reporting and publishing data.  It combines three complementary systems and processes: the DAC’s Creditor Reporting System (CRS) and the Forward Spending Survey (FSS) – two reporting instruments of the OECD with comprehensive statistical information – plus IATI.

The common standard enables and encourages providers of development co‑operation to make aid information more transparent along four dimensions:

  1. Greater availability of historical, current and future information on aid flows;
  2. More detailed information on aid projects and programmes (improved comprehensiveness);
  3. Broader coverage and participation (beyond ODA, and beyond traditional donors); and
  4. Improved timeliness and more frequent updates of development financing information.
- See more at: http://www.publishwhatyoufund.org/updates/by-topic/iati/busan-common/#sthash.c7eiiVJi.dpuf

The common standard sets out good practice in reporting and publishing data.  It combines three complementary systems and processes: the DAC’s Creditor Reporting System (CRS) and the Forward Spending Survey (FSS) – two reporting instruments of the OECD with comprehensive statistical information – plus IATI.

The common standard enables and encourages providers of development co‑operation to make aid information more transparent along four dimensions:

  1. Greater availability of historical, current and future information on aid flows;
  2. More detailed information on aid projects and programmes (improved comprehensiveness);
  3. Broader coverage and participation (beyond ODA, and beyond traditional donors); and
  4. Improved timeliness and more frequent updates of development financing information.
- See more at: http://www.publishwhatyoufund.org/updates/by-topic/iati/busan-common/#sthash.c7eiiVJi.dpuf




The International Aid Transparency Initiative (IATI) aims to make information about aid spending easier to find, use and compare.

IATI was launched in September 2008 in Accra, Ghana. It is a multi-stakeholder initiative that has brought together donors, developing country governments, civil society and aid information experts to agree on a common, open, international standard for publishing more, and better, information about aid. The Standard was agreed in February 2011, and a variety of assistance-providing and implementing organisations have now started publishing data on their projects in line with the Standard.

The Standard sets guidelines for publishing information about aid spending. It does not create a new database. IATI will not replace work already being done by organisations such as the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC) to produce statistics about past aid flows and aid activities. Instead, IATI builds on, and goes beyond the standards and definitions that have already been agreed.

The majority of information within the IATI Standard refers to activity-level data. This PDF document provides an overview of what sort of information should be included when reporting on an activity.

Aid Statistics:

Slovak Republic - total official and private flows (OECD - DAC1)

Common Standard:

Slovak Republic Implementantion schedule

Bilateral Development Projects:
In order to comply with international standards, the Slovak Agency for International Development Cooperation has been publishing detailed information about bilateral development projects via interactive map. The agency aims to provide the public as much relevant data as possible and help to raise awareness about development aid